Listen here – you shouldn’t start a P2P project without a blueprint

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Listen here – you shouldn’t start a P2P project without a blueprint

In my office at home, I have a blueprint of the Golden Gate bridge. It’s a souvenir of a visit to San Francisco a few years ago.

Can you imagine if the guys that built the bridge turned up on site with all of the materials and workers, the girders and rivets, cable and concrete and the first thing they did was to “workshop” what the bridge would look like.

While it might be an advantage that they knew the components to use and that they’d built bridges before, you’d certainly want to ask the question“where are the plans, the surveys, the blueprints?”

But I have to say, almost every Purchase to Pay project I have seen in recent years has started like this. We start with a big box of best practice tools and techniques and the first thing we do is ask “what shall we build?” It’s even in the implementation methodology.

But it doesn’t have to be like this. P2P blueprinting is a no-brainer. It reduces cost, it eliminates risk and it avoids some of the problems that can be confronted when a project is in mid-flight.

I spoke to Trevor Tyler from Xoomworks recently who is a fellow advocate of P2P blueprinting and we discussed why this approach is such a good idea.