Purchasing Insight

Purchase to Pay, Purchasing & Procurement Process, Electronic Invoicing

Browsing Posts in Supply Chain

On the back of the extraordinary announcements over recent weeks , MasterCard and Basware have just declared another supply chain finance deal.

It’s a big deal and it’s another sign if we needed it that products and services providing working capital support to business is one of the faster growing areas in B2B. I chatted to Esa Tihilä, CEO of Basware and Hany Fam, President, Global Strategic Alliances at MasterCard last week about this new partnership. It’s good news for Basware – they now have an important new string to their bow, but I think it’s even better news for MasterCard who couldn’t have chosen a better partner. continue reading…

Q4 2013 may well be remembered as the inflexion point for AP automation and supply chain finance.

The synergy between e-invoicing and supply chain finance (SCF) has been recognized for some time but the reality of business is that despite the benefits staring us in the face, it takes time to put the pieces together and for it to become a reality. Software needs to be developed or adapted, marketing campaigns crafted and pilot programmes need to run their course. This all takes years. So when we see solutions emerging and new offerings launched, it’s not because everyone has suddenly seen the light – the early adopters saw the light a long time ago and what we’re seeing now is the culmination of years of effort.

The OB10 deal announced last week follows two years of behind the scenes discussion. Tradeshift’s $3bn fund to support small business is the realization of a vision that Christian Lanng shared with me about 3 years ago and just this week a new player on the scene, Crossflow Payments, emerged into the fading light of late summer after 3 years of research and development.  I met Tony Duggan, the CEO, this week in The City of London to understand what they have to offer. continue reading…

Tradeshift has just  made a double announcement. Their new customer reference, Lear Corporation is impressive enough but it Tradeshift’s Collaborative Workflow that Lear is deploying that’s caught my attention.

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Critical components in your supply chain are at risk – and you may not even know it. There are numerous points of failure in today’s complex supply chains and because of the difficulty that upstream suppliers have funding their business from day to day, the risk of a damaging and expensive failure is increasing. And it gets worse. Efforts to cut costs have resulted in leaner, riskier supply chains held together by a network small suppliers. If the risk of financial failure isn’t mitigated it could have disastrous consequences – which is why businesses – especially in Europe – should begin to take supply chain finance more seriously. continue reading…

Startups and young businesses thrive when their people do their jobs because they want to change the world, they want to get rich or they want to do what they love to do. But as they grow, founders execute their exit plans, hopefully happily, and the accountants move in. The business drivers change. The raison d’etre becomes about numbers and regulation. They’re either fixated on quarterly earnings figures or obsessed with compliance. They get third parties in far flung places to run their back office, even core business activities get outsourced and offshored. The business stops being about the hopes, dreams and ambitions of its people. They even outsource them. continue reading…

This month, State of Flux, the London based procurement and supply chain consultancy, has launched its fourth annual Global SRM Survey 2012 which is, for the first time, divided into two areas: a buy-side survey to validate the procurement and supply chain perspective and a sell-side survey that captures the account team perspective of SRM. The new approach should provide one of the fairest reviews to date of both the supplier and the customer experiences of current SRM globally. continue reading…

It’s been my guilty secret for a few years now. I buy Apple stuff. Why the guilt? Because of Apple’s reputation about their supply practices.

The reputation says that Apple products are built in factories in far flung places where working conditions are so poor that overworked and underpaid staff are flinging themselves from the rooftops. But actually, the facts about Apple’s supply chain have been difficult to ascertain because, like their product development, the details have always been a closely guarded secret. Until now that is. continue reading…