Purchasing Insight

Purchase to Pay, Purchasing & Procurement Process, Electronic Invoicing

Browsing Posts in Electronic Invoicing

Today, another post from Richard Manson from CloudTrade

Let’s start at the beginning. What do we know about 26? Wikipedia – the font of all knowledge – tells me that 26 is ‘the natural number following 25 and preceding 27’. OK, I can go with this. That’s pretty accurate I guess.

But I know it is more than that. So what else?

Apparently a shape with 26 faces is a rhombicuboctahedron. But, hey, my 2 year old could have told me that… (Note to self, remember that for the next pub quiz).

It is the atomic number for Iron (also useful for the pub quiz).

But moving away from impressive ways to win £50 on a Thursday night…

What else do we know?

The 26th letter and the last letter of the English alphabet is Z. It is the length of a marathon (26 miles and 385 yards to be exact). The human foot and ankle has 26 bones. 26 is the total number of cases on the US version of Deal or No Deal.

….OK, I feel we are now slipping back to the realms of the pub quiz.

So we can see there are many interesting instances of the number 26. Yet the most important (in our eyes at least!) seems to be missing. And without wishing to question the accuracy of Wikipedia, I feel it my duty to reveal the most important, yet missing, reference. continue reading…

This week I had the pleasure to support a seminar session run by Canon promoting their P2P offering. This is the transcript of my presentation

P2P has always been important – important in the sense that it has always been important to ensure that the correct approval is given before something is bought. It’s important in the sense that it has always been important to ensure that suppliers are paid according to contractual terms – and important in the sense that it’s important to ensure that the details on an invoice sent by a supplier match what was asked for and what was delivered.

But P2P has taken on a greater importance in recent years and there are three things that have put P2P in the spotlight

  • Visibility
  • Accountability
  • Automation

continue reading…

This is how the thought process goes for AP automation:

“Electronic invoicing could save us lots of time. We could automate accounts payable.”

“Wait – this could be to be complicated. We’d need a project manager and an expert. We may have to buy in some software or work with a third party. Actually this stuff doesn’t come free. It could cost a fortune.”

“$1 per invoice must be cheaper than the cost of a paper and manual process but at 1 million invoices per year, we’ll never justify that. Let’s make an incremental step toward automation. We can scan our invoices and handle them digitally.”

Yeah, right!

continue reading…

Today, a post from Richard Manson from CloudTrade

I recently received an email from a disgruntled supplier, unhappy at the request they had received from a customer asking them to submit their invoice via the ‘leading global e-invoice network’.

Their frame of mind wasn’t a reaction to the physical act of submitting electronic invoices – though they did say they weren’t impressed by the limited submission options available, and were concerned about the impact it would have on their business. Their dismay was that they were being asked to pay for the privilege of sending their own invoices to their customer – and pay far more than it would cost them to use the standard postal service! continue reading…

Today, Richard Manson from CloudTrade explains how EDI programmes can be transformed to extend their reach.

EDI is nothing new. In fact it has been around since the 1970’s. So why do most organisations that venture down this route still find it so hard to on-board suppliers? It’s not just the number of suppliers that are able and willing to adopt EDI, but also the time it takes to get suppliers on-board.

To get an insight into the issues, let’s first step through the typical supplier adoption process. continue reading…

I have a great deal of respect for Gartner and pay close attention to their insights and futurology. Despite that, I get a great sense of satisfaction on the occasions when I see what’s what before them.

It’s not news to me that Nipendo are cool but it’s great to see their coolness recognized by a firm as august as Gartner. Nipendo have been named as a “Cool Vendor” in Gartner’s new report “Cool Vendors in Integration, 2014” by Keith Guttridge, Massimo Pezzini, Paolo Malinverno & Jess Thompson. It means that, in the authors’ opinion, Nipendo are “Innovative, Impactful and Intriguing”. continue reading…

I had the pleasure of attending the formal launch of “Electronic Invoicing, the next steps towards digital government” on 30 April.

The report is a welcome indication of the seriousness with which the issue is taken in government. It is also a sensible document which does not fall into the trap of underestimating the complexities of the subject. I particularly liked that, although it favours some form of overt or covert mandating of eInvoicing, it does not mandate any particular technical means of achieving this.

Inevitably, when reading the document, questions arise and I explore a couple of them here. These are not intended to be criticisms of the work of the inquiry team, more ‘thoughts occasioned by’ the document and also as indications of some of the difficult issues facing them. continue reading…